The Original Batmobile

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1955. The Lincoln Futura was built in Italy for Ford by a body-building company called Ghia. Total cost for designing and building this one vehicle was a cool quarter of a million dollars.
Years later it was sold to George Barris who transformed it into the Batmobile for the television series. I prefer the original car, although the Batmobile ain’t too shabby either.
Click Here For Full Futura Article.
Click Here For The Making Of The Batmobile.

The Crocker Mansion-Los Angeles

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At the turn of the 20th Century, no building dominated Bunker Hill like the Crocker Mansion. Perched high at the corner of Third and Olive, the imposing 3-story Victorian structure overlooked the emerging metropolis for a mere 22 years. Though its reign over Bunker Hill was short, the Crocker Mansion remains an indelible part of early Los Angeles history.
Click Here For Full Article.

The Stroh Violin

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This now pretty rare instrument had been developed and patented by Johann Matthias Augustus Stroh at around 1900 for use in the Phono Industry due to its more focused and more voluminous sound compared to normal violins and got more attention during the last years , by being used on recordings by bluesman Tom Waits, amongst others.
This quality instrument comes out of south-east-asian manufacturing with a lot of attention to details.
Strohviolin.com
Inside The Early Recording Studios

Matchbook Art

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From the 1920s to the 1950s, a ubiquitous advertising gimmick made its way into the purses, pockets and kitchen drawers of millions of Americans. The giveaway matchbook, from its humble origins as an entrepreneurial gamble, quickly caught on and became one of the most pervasive means ever found of putting promotional images into the hands of the public. Order Here.

Hot Off The Press

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The Queer Movie Poster Book by writer and filmmaker Jenni Olson is a colorful and often amusing look back at many of the images that have represented—or misrepresented—queer people over the past century. Olson’s survey is admirably balanced between films about gay men and films about lesbians, even though she points out that films about men have always outnumbered those about women, straight or gay. The book is divided into chapters by decade, with each poster accompanied by a brief paragraph exploring its imagery and significance.
Click Here For Full Review.
Click Here To Order From Amazon.

Rare Chano Pozo

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I just found this rare photo of Chano Pozo, playing his conga backstage with Dizzy Gillespie. Chano’s legacy is one of mythical proportions, and I couldn’t believe it when I found this rare, unseen photo. For decades his music was difficult to find, until 2001, when a three CD box set was finally released (Chano Pozo-El Tambor De Cuba), containing thousands of dollars worth of rare records, along with a nice thick booklet of pics, bio, etc.

The End Of A Perfect Day

Four years before making the classic film noir Double Indemnity, Fred MacMurray and Barbara Stanwyck co-starred in Remember The Night (1940)-a sweet and sentimental comedy written by Preston Sturgis. This clip features the vocal talents of Sterling Holloway, who was later the voice of Winnie The Pooh, the cheshire cat (Alice In Wonderland), and Kaa (The Jungle Book). I found this song to be soothing in these chaotic times we are currently living in. Enjoy!

Too Much Time On My Hands

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Okay. I thought I must have way too much time on my hands, as I’m constantly cruising the internet for weird & intersting trivia. But now I’m feeling much better about things, as I have just found that there are people out there who have built entire websites dedicated to the 60’s teen cult classic film Village Of The Giants.
Click here for page 1. Page 2. Enjoy!

1961 Amphicar

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A vehicle that promised to revolutionize drowning, the Amphicar was the peacetime descendant of the Nazi Schwimmwagen (say it out loud — it’s fun!). The standard line is that the Amphicar was both a lousy car and a lousy boat, but it certainly had its merits. It was reasonably agile on land, considering, and fairly maneuverable on water, if painfully slow, with a top speed of 7 mph. Its single greatest demerit — and this is a big one — was that it wasn’t particularly watertight. Its flotation was entirely dependent on whether the bilge pump could keep up with the leakage. If not, the Amphicar became the world’s most aerodynamic anchor. Even so, a large number of the nearly 4,000 cars built between 1961 and 1968 are still on the road/water. In fact, during the recent floods in Britain, an Amphicar enthusiast served as a water taxi, bringing water and groceries to a group of stranded schoolkids.

Bedtime Stories For Adults

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Long before the rise of the modern gay movement, an unnoticed literary revolution was occurring between the covers of the cheaply produced lesbian pulp paperbacks of the post–World War II era. In 1950, publisher Fawcett Books founded its Gold Medal imprint, inaugurating the reign of lesbian pulp fiction. These were the books that small-town lesbians and prurient men bought by the millions — cheap, easy to find in drugstores, and immediately recognizable by their lurid covers: often a hard-looking brunette standing over a scantily clad blonde, or a man gazing in tormented lust at a lovely, unobtainable lesbian. For women leading straight lives, here was confirmation that they were not alone and that darkly glamorous, “gay” places like Greenwich Village existed. Some — especially those written by lesbians — offered sympathetic and realistic depictions of “life in the shadows,” while others (no less fun to read now) were smutty, sensational tales of innocent girls led astray. In the overheated prose typical of the genre, this collection documents the emergence of a lesbian subculture in postwar America. Click Here To Order From Amazon.

Gleason Dug Dali

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Jackie Gleason‘s 1955 chart-topper Lonesome Echo features more lush interpretations of standards such as “I’m Always Chasing Rainbows,” “The Thrill Is Gone,” “Deep Purple,” and “How Deep Is the Ocean.” The album also features striking cover artwork by surrealist master Salvador Dali.

Runyon & Broadway

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Damon Runyon grew up in the West, moved to New York City, and became one of the leading voices of American popular culture. From sports writing to short fiction, this unique collection offers an eclectic sampling of his extraordinary talent. Here are newspaper pieces, stories— including the last one he ever composed—poetry, and, of course, the Broadway tales for which he is chiefly remembered: Guys and Dolls, Blood Pressure, The Bloodhounds of Broadway, and others. Featuring works that are impossible to find elsewhere, and Runyon’s signature eye for detail—particularly the sounds, smells, and tastes of New York—this book brings an American icon to a new generation of readers. Also features great cover art by Al Hirschfeld.